Agreement on the Conservation of Albatrosses and Petrels

Albatross_Density_MapWorldwide distribution of Albatross. The deeper the shade of red the more species found there.

Source: NRG800 Wikimedia Commons

Diomedea_exulans_in_flight_-_SE_TasmaniaAlbatross (Diomedea exulans) in flight. Photographed by JJ HarrisonThe Agreement on the Conservation of Albatrosses and Petrels (ACAP) was signed in 2001 over concern for the dramatic decreases in many seabird populations, primarily albatrosses and petrels in the Southern Hemisphere.  These declines are linked to seabird bycatch from fishing, but are also connected to the presence of predatory invasive species such as cats and rats in many of their nesting areas.  ACAP calls on its signatories to enact measures to protect and restore habitats, control invasive species populations, conduct research on seabird populations, and enact fishing regulations that minimize seabird bycatch.  ACAP currently has 13 signatories, and the United States has expressed interest in ratification.

ACAP holds regular Meetings of the Parties (MoP), where Parties to the Agreement meet to discuss progress in albatross and petrel conservation and make decisions about future actions.  ASOC attends these meetings as an observer. Our reports from these meetings are below.

 More information about ACAP and its activities can be found on their website.

 

Publications: Agreement on the Conservation of Albatrosses and Petrels