Why ASOC?

Antarctica is the natural heritage of all humankind, and this incredible wilderness belongs to us all. 

It’s up to us to protect it.

Tourist in Antarctica

Antarctica is formidable but fragile.

A single footprint in Antarctica can last for decades.

We must take extreme care or this region’s uniqueness will be lost forever.

glacier calving at Neko harbour
Neko harbour

The climate crisis is changing Antarctica.

Antarctica and the Southern Ocean play a vital role in regulating the global climate and slowing down global heating. These powerful but delicately-balanced systems are changing due to the climate crisis. 

The world needs a strong, unified voice to advocate for Antarctic protection in this time of rapid change.

Emperor Penguins
Emperor Penguins

Antarctica is the only continent in the world with no indigenous human population. 

Why ASOC?

Antarctica isn’t a country or a nation, and it doesn’t have a government or a legal system.

This special place belongs to all of humanity, and with no Antarctic citizens, it’s up to all of us to speak up on its behalf.

ASOC CCAMLR Delegation Group Photo (2019)
ASOC delegation group at CCAMLR 2019

One voice for Antarctica

Why ASOC?

Antarctica is governed by over 50 nations, which come together each year to make decisions about the future of Antarctica.

Since 1991, ASOC has represented the Antarctic conservation community at these meetings, to advocate for stronger Antarctic protections at the highest levels of Antarctic governance.

“Antarctica is the world’s last great wilderness. We have a unique opportunity to prevent some of the widespread environmental problems that have occurred elsewhere and chart a new course for our relationship with nature – one where we safeguard ourselves by safeguarding the natural systems that make life on earth possible.”

Claire Christian, Executive Director

WHY ASOC?

Our mission:

To continue to protect the Antarctic and Southern Ocean’s unique and vulnerable ecosystems by providing the unified voice for Antarctic conservation.

Video: courtesy of Richard Sidey